Monday, April 16, 2012

Blogging from A-Z || N || Needles

Needles.  I couldn't do bead weaving with out them!  They are my constant companion.  My little army of helpers. Oh sure, they start out tall and straight....but after being between my fingers for hours at a time, they start to bend and curve just right, into the hole of the next bead. 




Sometimes the curve isn't working for a project and a new needle is in order.  Sometimes a straight needle isn't working right and you need a little curve. 

My small army of needles shown above are bead project veterans.  They stay in the field until their eye breaks or they snap in half. 

Thank you needle brigade!  You are the unsung heroes of bead weaving!


9 comments:

  1. I too have a little army of needles, and I am very glad to hear I'm not alone in snapping them in half though that is usually only my big eye needles.

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  2. Hi,Amy:-)
    Once I was told that the needles from the UK are the best.So,bought some packets of them to check in practice.My 'army of helpers would look the same,I think,but it would be rather hard to have 'veterans' there,because the life of such one is rather short and it dies on the 'batterfield' in some days time.many of them cannot stand even the time of one project.Their holes become thinner and thinner,so after some stitch,when change the tread,I have to take another,more rigid needle to pierce the hole and make it bigger.I spoiled many needles this way.Afterwards,going thru the certain bead,all the hole,with the part of the needle can be left in my hand and the second part...in a bead:-))They bend...in 'Chinese eighty':-))...as they are too soft,but still serve me well.I used lots of needle-packets,but...the UK's needles are still the best:-))
    Fantastic blog post again-very similar feelings to mine:-)
    Warm Hugs-Halinka-

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  3. When it comes to needles, my hero would be found under T for Tulip. They're a little pricey, but since I've been using Tulip needles, I don't think I've split a thread, and I know I haven't broken a bead or a needle. They're a fabulous find for projects that call for small beads and tight tension. I find myself reaching for mine all the time!

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  4. I agree with Halinka that English needles are best. I love them. I haven't tried the Tulip needles but I've heard several times that they're great.

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  5. Needles and me do not get along for some reason. They hate me. Not sure what they have against me but they sure do like to poke me.

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  6. I have tried just about every type of needle out there. My fave is indeed Tulip, but I find that different projects call for differnet needles. I agree, sometimes a bent needle does get the job done better.
    -Debbie

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  7. Hi Amy,
    I have lots of bent soldiers waiting in line for their duty on the front line. I have not really experimented with different needles. I feel like if it does the job at hand it is good enough for me, but I must admit I am curious about the Tulip needles.
    Therese

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  8. And sometimes their eyes are so tiny it's hard to see to thread them!

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  9. It's nice to see you have needles in the same condition as me! I am hoping to splurge on some Tulip needles soon but as they apparently don't bend easily I am thinking they won't have quite the same amount of character. Needles... something we take for granted in beading!

    Karyn

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Thank you for your comments!! They really mean a lot!